Woollard, Charles

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Woollard, Charles

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Dates of existence

b. Dec. 26/1871 d. [1924]

History

Charles was born December 26/1871.<sup>1</sup> He grew up in London where he came from a poor family. As a boy of 14 he escaped poverty by enlisting in the British Army as a drummer boy. He was sent to Africa in 1899 where he took part in the Boer War,<sup>2</sup> serving in the I Battery R.C.F.A South Africa Contingent<sup>3</sup>.

After the war, he moved to Ontario where he put himself through medical school by driving a milk truck. When he finished medical school he moved to the west coast where he met his wife Grace.<sup>4</sup> They were married shortly after 1912.<sup>5</sup> The two moved to Whistler where they built a cabin on Alta Lake. On Feb. 5/1915 Charles enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force as a Colonel.<sup>6</sup> He was wounded in action and sent back to Vancouver.<sup>7</sup>

While there he worked at the Shaughnessy Military Hospital. In the interview with his granddaughter Margaret Bellamy she makes claim that it was in fact Charles that started the hospital, but this has yet to be confirmed. After the war he and his family returned to Whistler where they found their cabin on Alta Lake occupied by the family of a Cabinet Minister from Victoria. His daughter was suffering from tuberculosis and under doctors orders she had been brought to Whistler for the benefit of the clean mountain air. Graciously, the Woollards allowed the family to continue to live in the cabin. The Woollards had a new summer cabin built in an area that was then called Tea House Rock. Today it is known as Blueberry Hill. The Woollard family and the Clarke family became very close through the friendship of Charles and William, who was Charles subordinate at the hospital. Charles would later died of nagging war wounds. According to Margaret Belamy, Charles died when her mother Betty was nine years old.<sup>8</sup> This likely puts his death in the year 1924.

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Related entity

Woollard, Grace (d. 1969)

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family

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Grace was Charles' wife

Related entity

Woollard Clarke, Betty (b. June 14/1915)

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family

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Betty was Charles' daughter

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Sources

<sup>1</sup> Military Attestation Paper of Charles Woollard found on Ancestry.ca
<sup>2</sup>Oral history interview with Margaret Bellamy.
<sup>3</sup> Military Attestation Papers of Charles Woollard found on Ancestry.ca
<sup>4</sup> Oral history interview with Margaret Bellamy.
<sup>5</sup> Florence Petersen, "First Tracks: Whistler's Early History".
<sup>6</sup> Military Attestation Papers of Charles Woollard found on Ancestry.ca
<sup>7</sup> Oral history interview with Margaret Bellamy.
<sup>8</sup> Oral history interview with Margaret Bellamy.

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